Meaningful August baseball

Some people might question the Jays having decided to go for it this year, given that they were 53-52 on August 1st and are still 6 games back. But it’s easier to understand when you realize that the Jays have played very little meaningful August and September baseball since their 1993 World Series win.

Here’s a complete list of the Jays’ won-lost records on August 1 since 1993. The last two columns are their position in the standings and the number of games back.

2015 53-52 3 6.0
2014 60-51 2 2.5
2013 50-58 5 15
2012 51-53 5 10
2011 55-53 4 12
2010 54-51 4 12.5
2009 50-54 4 12
2008 54-55 4 10.5
2007 53-54 3 12
2006 57-49 3 6.5
2005 53-51 3 6
2004 45-59 5 21
2003 54-55 3 13
2002 47-59 4 19.5
2001 50-58 3 15.5
2000 55-53 3 5.5
1999 59-48 2 5.0
1998 55-56 4 25.5
1997 51-55 3 16
1996 50-58 3 15
1995 39-48 5 10
1994 50-55 4 16

The Jays have only been less than 5 games out once since 1993, and that was last year, when they were only 2 1/2 out. But last year’s Jays fell into a well at this time of the year – they went 2-9 in their next 11 games, and were 7.5 back on August 15 and out of contention.

There have been only four other seasons since 1993 in which the Jays were less than 10 games back on August 1st. And in all four, they never really got close:

  • In 2006, the Jays lost the next four games, and fell to 9.5 back.
  • In 2005, the Jays never got closer than 6 out.
  • In 2000, they made it to 4.5 back, but then gradually fell off the pace.
  • In 1999, they never got closer than 5 games back.

So it’s reasonable to argue that the Jays haven’t played meaningful late summer baseball in a generation. Who can blame Alex Anthopoulos for making a move, even if the odds of post-season baseball are 50-50 at best? None of us are getting any younger.

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About davetill

I'm a writer and occasional web designer. I live in Toronto.
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